Point of Rocks

My last article focused on Lucketts, Virginia. Driving north on US-15 from there we cross into Maryland at the Potomac River, just over the river we come to Point Of Rocks. Before turning onto MD-28 into Point of Rocks take a quick look to the left and you can see the original tunnel that bears the name of the town.


Today the town has spread northward to a few subdivisions, another of the many bedroom communities surrounding Washington. But as usual I’m concentrating on the old towns and one of its raison d’être, the railroad station. The other reason is that it is located on the C&O Canal, but more of the canal in a later article.



As seems to be the habit of small towns, Point of Rocks has a fair number of churches and one convenience store/gas station, and of course a small town park.

But what is most important, a railroad station. This station has the reputation of being one of the most photographed station in this part of the country, and I’ve contributed to that reputation.

Many freight trains pass through here, both from Washington to the south and Frederick a few miles north on their way westward. This station is one of the stops on the MARC Commuter Train in southern Frederick County and Loudoun County in northern Virginia.


Twice a day Amtrak’s CAPITOL LIMITED passes through Point of Rocks on its trips between Washington, DC and Chicago.

A railroad in Railroad

Well, the previous article was about Gainesville, Ga. really stretched my idea of a Small Town. I hope this atones for that sin. This one is not only small, but it keeps with one of the motifs of that article, Railroad. This time I’m traveling northward, only a few miles north of the Mason-Dixon Line into Pennsylvania

Yes, a railroad runs through the small borough of Railroad, Pa. The borough boasts a population of just a few hundred, a Church or two and a BnB. Of course there is the ‘required’ antique ship for any small country town.

The rail line was built from Baltimore, Md. to Harrisburg, Pa. but today the rail line is almost unused. But for about 45 miles along the tracks from Baltimore to York, Pa the Rails to Trails Conversancy has worked to build multi-use trail. I’ve cycled the entire route a few times, but only about half at a time. Besides bicycling the NCR trail as it is known in Maryland and the York Heritage trail in Pennsylvania caters to many other activities. Hiking, horseback riding, dog walking, or just enjoying fresh air and seeing nature.

But today’s photos are only of one town, more of a borough in Pennsylvania. This one actually got it’s name from the railroad, “RAILROAD”, so says the great authority on all such things, Wikipedia.

The biggest building in Railroad, and in the summer it is probable the liveliest place in town is the Jackson House B&B. It sits adjacent to the trail and railroad tracks

Across the street, the only street in town is an old building that looks to have been some sort of wearhouse.

Just up the road is a curious barn with a couple “horses”.

My first walk through Railroad was just before Holloween, these flags were the only decorations I saw, but there were steps leading to … could that be a haunted house?


Ah yes, the town postoffice and the General Store Clock – which doesn’t seem to keep the right time.

I’ve warned you, I don’t take the normal tourist photos, two more.

What happens on the trail? Why walking and cycling!

And the occasional train! I’ll close with a short video of some activity on in Railroad.

Where’s my next stop? You’ll have to keep guessing for a month or so. I think I know, I’ve been working on it but I like to seep some surprises in store for you.